Research Interest

Tsuji Laboratory

Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University

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Development of Highly Efficient Molecular Catalysts and their Application

Organometallic compounds are one of the most important molecules since transition metals have potential to construct various unique compounds by use of their d or f orbitals. The recent advances of theoretical calculations help us to design unique ligands that are quite important to develop efficient molecular catalysts. Our current research interest is focused on development of highly efficient molecular catalysts based on our excellent experimental techniques as well as advanced theoretical calculations. In order to maintain a good shape of a global environment as well as to solve energy problems, we synthesize highly efficient molecular catalysts being accompanied with high activity and selectively.

Development of Nano-Sized Homogeneous Molecular Catalysts

We are preparing various nano-sized ligands by use of several techniques including organic synthetic chemistry, molecular engineering and theoretical calculations. Figures 1 and 2 show a nano-sized Pt(0) complex and a nano-sized precursor of N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, which were recently synthesized by our group.

Figure 1. Pt(0) complex with the second dendrimer phosphine ligands.(A) Molecular structure.(B) Space-filling model of the complex calculated by CAChe/CONFLEX/MM3.

Figure 2. Molecular structure of a precursor of N-heterocyclic carbene ligand with the third dendrimers (Calculated by CONFLEX5/MMFF94s).

Development of Molecular Catalysts with Spatially Spread Structures

Our current research topic is development of molecular catalysts having spatially unique structures. Figure 3 shows bowl-shaped phosphines (BSP). We have recently found that both the length (/) and the depth (d) of the BSPs are very important to accelerate several catalytic reactions and to utilize inactive substrates such as aryl chlorides.

Figure 3. Bowl-shaped phosphines

 

Tsuji Laboratory

Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University